Zygomatic Bones * 2021 New Anatomical Structures

Zygomatic Bone are joints at the base of a skull that are put together by the process of fusion. The zygomatic process of fusion is characterized by two bones coming together to form a bond, which then becomes the main bone of the joint. The two bones are fused in such a way that they are able to articulate with each other without coming apart or breaking apart in size. This allows for the bones to work as one cohesive unit. The two fused zygomatic bones that make up the front of the temporal face come together in the frontal region to form the infratemporal and the parietal faces. The zygomatic process of fusion is also known as the coronal and the frontal process. The common feature between these two processes is that they fuse into one another and lie on the posterior surface of the skull at the level of the forehead. The second process, which is also known as the frontal process, originates from the middle of the forebrain extending to the base of the temporal teeth. The parietal faces have a high degree of variation in their form.

In addition to the zygomatic bone that makes up the front of the temporal face, there are also three flat zygomatic bones that lie along the top edge of the orbit. These flat zygomatic bones, which are called the spinosum and the spinosular, can be seen by looking into the mirror below the eye. The flat zygomatic bone in the eyelid is called the infraorbital bone and it is located between the infratemporal and the frontal. The ear-tip area is made up of three flat zygomatic bones, which are known as the spinosum and the spinosular. It is important to note that the ear tip has three flat bones because the ear can expand during breathing that is why it is important to note that these three bones actually form part of a single structure known as the spinosum.

Zygomatic Bones * 2021 New Anatomical Structures Anatomical Structures

The Zygomatic Bone and the Zygomatic Processes

Zygomatic bone and the various processes that it links form a lattice work that is known as the articular tubercle. This lattice work forms the basis for the articulations that occur in the face. Articular tubercle articulations occur when there is movement or bending of the face and these are considered to be medial, frontal, and posterior. The four processes that link the articular tubercle form a grand total of twenty-five articulations that occur on each side of each eye.

The twenty-five articulations that link the zygomatic bone to the spinosum and the spinosular happen to be located inside the zygomatic bone’s central area. In order to make sure that the connection among the spinosum and the zygomatic bone is stable a thickened suture is used. It is important to note that although the suture is thickened the articular frame is not actually sealed. There is a slight shifting of pressure which is called the ‘sag’ as the articular frame shifts towards the spinosum and the suture also grows thinner near the ends.

There are different methods that are used to determine the level of facial prominence. The level of facial prominence is measured from the midpoint of the orbit to the base of the ear. The midpoint of the orbit refers to the lower part of the nose, whereas the base of the ear refers to the upper part of the nose. A high degree of facial prominence means that the orbit is wider than the lower part of the nose. Conversely, a low degree of facial prominence means that the lower nose is wider than the upper part of the nose.

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